“Unsex me here” Lady Macbeth as a Disruptive Force in Macbeth

Authors

  • Saman Ali Mohammed Department of English, College of Language, University of Human Development. Sulaimani, Kurdistan Region – F.R. Iraq http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8016-1319

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21928/juhd.v2n1y2016.pp479-489

Keywords:

Witchcraft, Patriarchy, Maternity, Sovereignty, Order, Power, Ambition, Femininity

Abstract

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth was most likely written in 1606, three years into the reign of James I, James VI of Scotland since 1567 before he achieved the English throne in 1603. Macbeth is Shakespeare’s shortest tragedy yet it is one of his most influential and emotionally intense plays. Macbeth portrays “the paralyzing, almost complete destruction of human spirit” (Shanley 307). Like most of Shakespeare’s plays, Macbeth deals with the question of kingship and portrays the “problems of legitimacy and succession” surrounding serious political power that belonged to the monarch, the court and the royal councils (Hadfield 27). Numerous historical and literary studies have been conducted about various topics in Macbeth such as human desire, cruelty, and guilt. Gender role and its relation with power also have a great significance to the interpretation of the play.

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Published

2016-01-31

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Section

Articles